Yueming Li, Ph.D.

Member and Professor at the Sloan-Kettering Institute and Director of Graduate Program in Pharmacology

Member of the Neuroscience Program, the Weil Medical College of Cornell University

Currently, Dr. Yueming Li is a Member and Professor at the Sloan-Kettering Institute and Director of Graduate Program in Pharmacology, and a member of the Neuroscience Program, the Weil Medical College of Cornell University. He received his Ph.D. degree in Comparative Biochemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. Then Yueming went to Harvard Medical School to conduct postdoctoral research. In 1997, he joined Merck Research Laboratories where he worked on elucidating the reaction mechanism of β- and γ-secretase, as well as developing protease inhibitors for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Since Yueming joined the Sloan-Kettering in 2002, he has progressed through the ranks from assistant to associate to full professor (member). The main interests of his laboratory are to elucidate the mechanism of γ-secretase-dependent Notch signaling and amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing under physiological and pathological conditions and to develop target-based therapies. He has been a pioneer biochemist in understanding the mechanisms of action and biological effects of g-secretase. His work in g-secretase assays, identification and reconstitution of g-secretase, the regulation of g-secretase and inhibitor development and the mechanism of action of g-secretase modulators has significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease and cancer as well as therapeutic development. He is a recipient of Zenith Fellows Award from the Alzheimer's Association. He is a recipient of the MetLife Foundation 2013 Awards for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s disease.

Funded Research

Project Description Researchers Funding
Discovery of Alzheimer’s Disease Blood Biomarkers Using Phage Display Technology

Absence of biomarkers has posed a formidable challenge in the development of effective treatment for Alzheimer disease (AD). Blood-based biomarkers could offer advantages that allow for early AD diagnosis and are critical in monitoring efficacy in clinical studies. Proposed studies aim to identify a set of novel blood biomarkers and examine their potential application as diagnostic agents. Phage display is a powerful approach to engineer peptides or proteins for binding to targets of interest.

2013
$100,000