Research Updates

Exposure to Air Pollution May Increase Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted: Apr. 14, 2013

The study, led by Cure Alzheimer’s Research Consortium member Sam Gandy, M.D., Ph.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, examined how elements in air pollution such as nickel nanoparticles affect the levels of certain peptides in the brain that are found to be at heightened levels in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease.

“We don’t yet completely understand why the peptides accumulate, but we do know the genes responding to the peptides play an important role in developing Alzheimer’s,” said Gandy.

Traumatic Brain Injury Linked to Alzheimer's and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases

Posted: Apr. 11, 2013

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can lead to neurodegenerative syndromes that include Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

The April issue of Nature Reviews Neurology is devoted to Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). Cure Alzheimer’s Fund research consortium member, Sam Gandy, M.D., Ph.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is senior author of the lead review and overview.

Reprogramming Cells to Understand Alzheimer's Disease

Posted: Mar. 28, 2013

Collaboration with the New York Stem Cell Foundation will involve using skin samples and brain imaging to identify causes and cures

Stem Cells Accelerate Research & Drug Discovery

Posted: Mar. 21, 2013

Washington—Uncovering the cure for Alzheimer’s disease at a rate never before possible and giving individuals a way to better understand their chances of facing Alzheimer’s are the outcomes of new advances in stem cell research from the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund (CAF) Stem Cell Research Consortium that use skin samples to identify potential therapies for the disease.

Origins of Alzheimer's Increasingly Clear

Posted: Nov. 11, 2012

Consensus among Alzheimer’s researchers about the origins of the disease is growing. Most, including members of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund Research Consortium, agree that a combination of factors, beginning with the excessive build-up of the peptide Abeta42  triggering  the development of tau tangles, nerve cell death, and inflammation are all required for Alzheimer’s pathology.

Cure Alzheimer's-seeded Research Bears Fruit in Major New NIH-funded Study

Posted: Sep. 5, 2012

A new study by David Holtzman of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund’s Research Consortium published by the journal “Science Translational Medicine” brings sharp new focus on the direct relationship between the accumulation of Abeta in the brain and notorious sleep problems associated with Alzheimer's disease. This NIH-funded study (also supported by Ellison Medical Foundation) was made possible by early pilot studies initiated by the Cure Alzheimer's Fund --- another great example of leveraging innovative research ideas into substantially funded, high impact projects.

New NEJM Study Opens Door to New Prevention Studies

Posted: Aug. 30, 2012

A study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine points to the value of conducting a new series of Alzheimer's prevention studies, suggests Cure Alzheimer's Consortium member Sam Gandy in an accompanying NEJM editorial. The study, led by Washington University's Randall J. Bateman, found that patients with a more genetic-oriented form of Alzheimer's experience a rise in beta-amyloid (Aβ) up to 25 years before symptoms begin -- and an increased level of tau protein up to 15 years before symptoms.

Solanezumab Fails in Trial -- But May Still Help with Mild Alzheimer's

Posted: Aug. 27, 2012

On Friday, August 24, Eli Lilly announced that their beta-amyloid immunotherapy (solanezumab) failed to meet its primary clinical endpoints for Alzheimer's disease. This disappointment follows the recent failure of another promising beta-amyloid immunotherapy, bapineuzumab from Pfizer/Johnson and Johnson-Jannsen/Elan. Both drugs failed in Phase 3 clinical trials, where they were being tested for their actual effect on Alzheimer's patients.

Gene Mutation Found that Protects Against Alzheimer’s, with Drug Discovery Implications

Posted: Jul. 12, 2012

Genes are the specific DNA blueprints for life, and all genes play roles that are essential for health. But some can carry DNA variants that influence risk for disease, either by increasing or decreasing susceptibility. If a variation in a gene is very rare, it’s called a mutation. The mutation may cause disease, increase risk for a disease, protect against a disease, or have no impact on health at all.

Untangling Tau: Seeking a Unified Understanding of Alzheimer's

Posted: Jun. 6, 2012

Alzheimer’s research for many years has been dominated by a focus on Abeta “plaques,” a focus that largely has overlooked the other infamous hallmark of the disease—the tau-based neurofibrillary “tangles.” The research world recently has broadened its scope to include significant research into tau.